Webpage Load Speed

Is Your Website Mobile Friendly? The Mobile Speed Test

So why do you want to know if your website is mobile friendly? Most likely it is because you have heard about last year’s announcement from google over at google webmaster central. It turns out that Google has updated their algorithm to significantly increase the weight of mobile-friendliness as a ranking signal. That’s right, significantly! So, optimizing your site for mobile is the way of the future!

3rd Party Content Monitoring

Most websites that exist today rely on 3rd party elements in one form or another.  For example, there are many services to gather analytics about site traffic such as Google analytics, but in order to work properly they require you to load a small script as a part of each web page like www.google-analytics.com/analytics.js.  This…

Monitoring SSL Migration – The road to HTTPS being the default on the web

  Google Announces HTTPS as a Ranking Signal for SEO It’s official, Google openly “encourage(s) all website owners to switch from HTTP to HTTPS to keep everyone safe on the web.” On Wednesday, August 06, 2014 – Google announced HTTPS as a ranking signal for SEO. If you’re not familiar, Hypertext Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) is a communications protocol…

Using Dotcom-Monitor’s Services, NCM Online Finds Midsized Web Hosts are the Best

Leveraging Dotcom-Monitor services, NCM Online developed fact-based observations about the performance of 20 leading web hosts in June, and continues to test additional hosts throughout the year (the most recent update to the list was 8/2/2014). These tests include purchasing a shared hosting plan from each provider and gathering page-load speed averages and uptime percentages from at least 10 concurrent days using identical websites on each provider. This process provides 2 of the ten criteria NCM Online uses to rank different shared hosting service providers.

New Features to Test How DNS Caching Affects Your Website

The new DNS caching features at Dotcom-Monitor allow you to perform some interesting tests that show how DNS caching can affect your page load speed.

We realize that many organizations monitor their online services with a number different goals in mind, and so we listened to the feedback we received that some users want to include the DNS response time in their monitoring and some users want to be able to remove DNS response from their monitors.

How you wish to handle DNS response time in regard to your monitoring needs is up to you, but we want to take this opportunity to show the differences in how DNS response time affects website load using our new tools.

We ran a test monitoring YouTube from a single location in the midwest United States with three different DNS cache settings. A basic HTTP full page load on the YouTube front page resulted in some interesting, although not that surprising results.

Keep in mind the results will vary depending upon a number of variables such as which locations you are monitoring from, the time of day, the load on the DNS servers, and on the website servers.